Historical Pictures of the Northwestern Pacific Railroad



Album 3

Northern California railroad pictures are from past calendars by the Northwestern Pacific Railroad Historical Society. Become a member!

 

Willits, October 7, 1928. Ten-wheeler 140 (Alco 1914) stands ready with steam up to help a southbound freight over the big hill immediately south of town. Little 201, a Prarie 2-6-2 with side tanks, also has a tender to carry additional water and her fuel oil. At this time 201 had seen very little service for three or four years. Note tool car 0142 beyond the locos and wrecker to far left.

Willits, October 7, 1928. Ten-wheeler 140 (Alco 1914) stands ready with steam up to help a southbound freight over the big hill immediately south of town. Little 201, a Prarie 2-6-2 with side tanks, also has a tender to carry additional water and her fuel oil. At this time 201 had seen very little service for three or four years. Note tool car 0142 beyond the locos and wrecker to far left.

 

North Pacific Coast No. 3 pilots the afternoon train northbound near San Geronimo in the late 1890's. This was a pioneer action photo of a moving train, taken by M. M. Tompkins, using rubber bands to speed the shutter of his old-time camera.

North Pacific Coast No. 3 pilots the afternoon train northbound near San Geronimo in the late 1890's. This was a pioneer action photo of a moving train, taken by M. M. Tompkins, using rubber bands to speed the shutter of his old-time camera.

 

Unusual doubleheaded passenger train stops at Willits Station in the early 1930's. Northbound Train No. 2 with NWP gas-electric No. 904, an RPO car and four coaches, had been helped over the big hill from Redwood Valley by a 130-class 4-6-0. Straight down the track we see the rear of a California Western Railway "Skunk" No. 100, about to depart for Fort Bragg as CWR Train 2.

Unusual doubleheaded passenger train stops at Willits Station in the early 1930's. Northbound Train No. 2 with NWP gas-electric No. 904, an RPO car and four coaches, had been helped over the big hill from Redwood Valley by a 130-class 4-6-0. Straight down the track we see the rear of a California Western Railway "Skunk" No. 100, about to depart for Fort Bragg as CWR Train 2.

 

"Fog Over Frisco" as NWP's paddle wheeler "Cazadero" departs from the famous Perry Building in 1920, while an early-evening fog off the Pacific crosses The City and touches the bay.

"Fog Over Frisco" as NWP's paddle wheeler "Cazadero" departs from the famous Perry Building in 1920, while an early-evening fog off the Pacific crosses The City and touches the bay.

 

NWP's treacherous Scotia Bluffs trestle work being cautiously negotiated by big ten-wheeler No. 182 with an excursion train on June 19, 1949. It is southbound about 25 miles south of Eureka. Timetable restricted speeds to 15 MPH for two miles here.

NWP's treacherous Scotia Bluffs trestle work being cautiously negotiated by big ten-wheeler No. 182 with an excursion train on June 19, 1949. It is southbound about 25 miles south of Eureka. Timetable restricted speeds to 15 MPH for two miles here.

 

San Francisco & North Pacific engine 18, built by Rogers in 1889. SF&NP was a predecessor of NWP; this loco was later NWP 101. Engineer E. H. Reynolds stops his freight at Santa Rosa for a turn-of-the-century photo, ca. 1900.

San Francisco & North Pacific engine 18, built by Rogers in 1889. SF&NP was a predecessor of NWP; this loco was later NWP 101. Engineer E. H. Reynolds stops his freight at Santa Rosa for a turn-of-the-century photo, ca. 1900.

 

San Francisco & Northwestern (Santa Fe subsidiary) steam dummy "0" at Carlotta. The homemade 8-wheeler carried passengers and express between there and Alton, where it connected with the main line.

San Francisco & Northwestern (Santa Fe subsidiary) steam dummy "0" at Carlotta. The homemade 8-wheeler carried passengers and express between there and Alton, where it connected with the main line. Harry Marnell's web site presents some information on the Alton & Pacific Railroad, a privately owned tourist attraction located on Highway 36 in nearby Alton. It no longer exists.

 

Santa Fe's San Francisco & Northwestern Railway built an imposing station at Eureka about 1903. It is shown in the exact center of this picture - it's the light-colored tower with the Santa Fe emblem below the peaked roof. View is looking north on the main line in front of the station.

Santa Fe's San Francisco & Northwestern Railway built an imposing station at Eureka about 1903. It is shown in the exact center of this picture - it's the light-colored tower with the Santa Fe emblem below the peaked roof. View is looking north on the main line in front of the station.

 

NWP 103, 4-6-0, in construction train service. Eel River country, 1914. Built by Richmond Locomotive Works in 1901 as SF&NP 20, No. 103 had a moment of fame in October 1914, when she hauled a special train to NWP's Gold Spike ceremony at Cain Rock. Scrapped in 1935.

NWP 103, 4-6-0, in construction train service. Eel River country, 1914. Built by Richmond Locomotive Works in 1901 as SF&NP 20, No. 103 had a moment of fame in October 1914, when she hauled a special train to NWP's Gold Spike ceremony at Cain Rock. Scrapped in 1935.

 

Narrow-gauge 90 was originally North Pacific Coast 15. Photo at Point Reyes Station engine house, circa 1920. Built by Brooks in 1891, she was scrapped in 1935.

Narrow-gauge 90 was originally North Pacific Coast 15. Photo at Point Reyes Station engine house, circa 1920. Built by Brooks in 1891, she was scrapped in 1935.

 


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The Alton & Pacific Railroad was a privately owned tourist attraction located on Highway 36 in nearby Alton. It no longer exists.

 

Heralded the "City of Fortuna", this steam locomotive, originally the Hammond Lumber Company Number 16, was once located near the entrance in Rohner Park. It is now being operated as an excursion train in Washington.
More information about this ALCO 2-8-2T.

 

For many years the Pacific Lumber Company used the railroad to move their lumber from the mills to shipping areas. They operated passenger trains as well. Here are some recent pictures of their railroad operations.

 

Three trainmen were killed in January 1953 at the Scotia Bluff when a landslide took their locomotive, the NWP184, into the icy Eel River. (Bill Bish pictures)